Mirriad’s AI slips ads into empty spaces in online videos

Mirriad’s AI slips ads into empty spaces in online videos

 

January 11, 2020: Software company Mirriad has developed a way for adverts to be “inserted” into films and television shows streamed online.

It uses artificial intelligence techniques to recognize objects in a scene and spot slots where branded goods and posters can be added without looking out of place.

The aim is to ultimately tailor the product placements to individual viewers’ interests.

The London-based ad tech firm showed off its software at the CES tech expo in Las Vegas Jan 2020, as BBC Click’s Lara Lewington reports.

See article here.

 

Old meets new as Univision brings dynamic product placements to telenovelas

Old meets new as Univision brings dynamic product placements to telenovelas

By Allison Schiff, January 16th, 2020

Spanish-language broadcaster Univision is spicing up its programming with advanced TV initiatives.

“Linear is changing, consumers are changing, and we’re doing what we can to shift along with those changes,” said Luis De La Parra, SVP of partner solutions at Univision.

But one thing that isn’t changing is viewers’ appetite for content. Some of Univision’s most engaged viewing comes from its telenovelas, a fast-paced cousin to the American soap opera. A typical telenovela airs daily during primetime for a limited time, perhaps just three or four months.

“It’s the original binge-watching,” De La Parra said. “We already have the attention, and now we’re experimenting with and testing new products that we can integrate in order to extend a brand’s message beyond the traditional 30-second spot.”

One recent experiment is with dynamic product placement through a partnership with Mirriad, which uses computer vision to embed brand assets within contextually relevant scenes. T-Mobile, an early tester of the technology, saw a 10% increase in brand awareness when it ran dynamically served units within Univision programming in conjunction with its usual 30-second spot.

AdExchanger caught up with De La Parra.

AdExchanger: What’s your process for selecting advertising and technology partners to work with?

LUIS DE LA PARRA: My job is about finding solutions that allow ad agencies and advertisers to better connect with the US Hispanic market – solutions that help us help brands advertise against this audience in prime time.

And we have a lot of content opportunities. We own two over-the-air networks, 12 cable networks, a vast number of digital assets and we, of course, have TV stations and radio stations. All of these assets give us the capability to do a lot of experiential and experimental things for brands across the country.

Do you partner with brands to do storyline tie-ins or product placement in shows?

We air a new telenovela episode every day of the week, Monday through Friday, and the vast majority – around 92% – of our viewing happens live, rather than on VOD, which makes prime time our most valuable screen time.

Advertising in these slots by integrating into a storyline is expensive and takes a lot of work. It’s not easy to do truly organic advertising that is embedded authentically into the narrative of a story. We see the future in terms of scalable executions. One example is the work we’re doing with Mirriad to put virtual ads into our novelas.

How much additional inventory are you able to generate with dynamic product placements?

It’s hard to quantify and it depends on the narrative of the story, but we probably find an additional three interaction points per episode, the equivalent of another 30-second unit of inventory per hour.

But it’s not only about more inventory, it’s about the quality of that inventory. We did internal research into whether inserting signage into a novela actually benefits an advertiser, and our findings indicate a huge increase in likability when people see these types of impressions in addition to 30-second spots. That means beyond adding more inventory, this allows brands to reinforce and amplify their existing messages without having to invest a lot of additional marketing resources.

Which of your advertisers are trying this out?

We’ve done this with a few different brands, but one of the most seamless has been T-Mobile. They provided us with a few simple brand assets, including digital ads and creative that could fit into out-of-home, and Mirriad detected spots within our episodes where we could place their ads organically, such as outdoor units in establishing shots, around malls or on the screen of a character’s computer – whatever made sense in the scene.

The next generation of this in our partnership with T-Mobile will be to add in sounds. If someone receives a call on their cell phone, for example, we could use the T-Mobile ring tone instead of a generic one.

What do you charge for something like this, and how do you package it with your other inventory?

We try to work in whatever way is most comfortable for the brand. It could be a four-month intellectual property fee or production fee, or it could be incremental value into their CPMs. It usually depends on how a brand has negotiated its upfronts. What’s good about the Mirriad partnership is that it happens outside of traditional upfront dollars, and it’s a simple rev share deal. We also don’t have to pay talent fees, because the talent isn’t directly endorsing the brand.

Dynamic product placement is cool, but do most advertisers still see it as experimental and early days?

The benefit is clear to us, but it always takes the advertising community a little longer to truly understand and adopt these sorts of things. For the moment, we’re just laser-focused on making sure that all of our partners, especially agencies, understand what this capability can do for brands.

See full article here.

How AI technology will change the way we treat advertising in 2020

How AI technology will change the way we treat advertising in 2020

By Ivan Guzenko, January 16th, 2020​

Breaking news: Advertising — as we’ve known it — has died to clear the path for the new generation’s experiential advertising. What is the essence of human experience? It is hard to tell, yet it is something that defines every one of us. We are wandering from screen to screen, place to place and career to career to capture this sense of the first experience.

When you look at commercials and banners that brands have been producing over the past decade, you will recognize a simple pattern. Advertising wanted us to be part of something complete and pre-defined — “We know how you should look, how you should feel about it and where you can buy it.” That’s what has shaped what critics call the mass consumer culture of the past decade.

There would be nothing wrong with this kind of experience if it weren’t so passive and forgettable. In the new marketing realms, customers will influence brands. Yes, technologies have already changed standard brand-customer interactions, and technologies will remain the main driver of customer experience 10 years from now. Still, brands will have to deepen their personalization options drastically to keep up with the competition — because the future has just begun.

AR and the future of product placement

More than 53% of viewers don’t watch any live TV ads; meanwhile, 70% of millennials claim to be among those who completely ignore all TV commercials.

What if there were no ad breaks on channels, and the advertising fit right into the TV show or movie? This idea was demonstrated in the 1927 movie Wings, which featured a Hershey’s chocolate bar in one scene.

Soon after, the world embraced the idea of product placement. It’s not uncommon to see a movie or TV show character use a well-known product or see that a company’s logo is featured somewhere on the screen. The trick doesn’t sell the product directly, but subconsciously, customers remember that moment, and when they get the need, they may buy the product featured. This industry has grown to the point that the James Bond film Skyfall boasted $45 million in product placement ads.

This product placement is now making its way into virtual reality and film. With these capabilities, advertisers could change product placements based on market specifics, perhaps touting Taco Bell for American audiences and a European chain for British viewers.

The largest Chinese video hosting platform, Tencent, has recently partnered with Mirriad AI to test this brand-new, real-time advertising placement mechanism. Banners, ads and corporate logos will appear in videos by request. If an actor drinks coffee, you’ll see a personalized ad on his cup, relevant only to you. This feature was demonstrated on Twitter. In the future, such technologies may become a gateway to ultimate branding opportunities, especially when it comes to addressing multi-screen millennials and most tech-savvy Generation Z members.

See full article here.

You see Pepsi, I see Coke: New tricks for product placement

You see Pepsi, I see Coke: New tricks for product placement

By Tiffany Hsu Dec. 20, 2019

First came product placement. In exchange for a payment, whether in cash, supplies or services, a TV show or a film would prominently display a brand-name product.

Then there was virtual product placement. Products or logos would be inserted into a show during the editing, thanks to computer-generated imagery.

Now, with the rise of Netflix and other streaming platforms, the practice of working brands into shows and films is likely to get more sophisticated. In the near future, according to marketing executives who have had discussions with streaming companies, the products that appear onscreen may depend on who is watching.

In other words, a viewer known to be a whiskey drinker could see a billboard for a liquor brand in the background of a scene, while a teetotaler watching the same scene might see a billboard for a fizzy water company.

Streaming services could also drop in brand-name products based on when a show is being watched. Someone who watches a streaming show in the morning could see a carton of orange juice within a character’s reach, while a different viewer watching the same thing in the afternoon could see a can of soda.

It could start within a year, said Stephan Beringer, the chief executive of Mirriad, a virtual product placement company that has worked with brands including Pepsi, Geico and Sherwin-Williams into ABC’s “Modern Family,” CBS’s “How I Met Your Mother” and the Univision program “El Dragón.”

Streaming services are more likely than traditional TV companies to pull off this specially targeted version of product placement because they have direct access to far more information on their customers. With every click of the remote, viewers tell the services something about themselves, information that can be used to determine which products might appeal to them.

This supercharged version of digital product placement is being developed at a time when the marketing business — which bet big on TV commercials for decades — needs new tricks to grab the attention of ad-hating cord-cutters.

Mr. Beringer, the head of Mirriad, said the current digital product placement technology has been successful enough to suggest that a bespoke version is a logical next step. “Viewers have been educated to look away from advertising,” he said. “But we’re putting something in that contextually makes sense. If you do it well, and it’s not annoying, it can work.”

Through digital video services like Hulu and YouTube, companies are already able to target viewers based on information about their ages, their locations, where they like to shop and other details. Some of the data is collected by the platforms themselves, others by outside data companies. And now streaming services are mulling how to make use of that information to create tailored product placements.

“Just like there’s no reason that all viewers of a program need to see the same advertisement, there’s no reason that they all need see the same brand integration or crossover campaign,” said David A. Schweidel, a marketing professor at Emory University.

Streaming platforms are trying out other advertising innovations, too. Hulu, a platform controlled by the Walt Disney Company, has ads that appear when a viewer hits the pause button. Last week, it rolled out specialized ads for people who are bingeing on three or more episodes of a show, with commercials for Kellogg’s, Maker’s Mark and Georgia-Pacific.

This year, the Walmart-owned streaming service Vudu enabled so-called shoppable ads on internet-connected televisions. With a click of the remote on the words “Add to Cart,” customers are able to drop an advertised product into their Walmart.com queue.

On the Roku Channel, a streaming channel on the company’s digital media player, viewers can click on certain commercials to request an email or text with details about the product on display. Roku, which spent $150 million this fall buying the software provider Dataxu to help companies plan and buy ad campaigns, then shares insights about the audience with the company behind the ad.

“Consumers are so much more empowered today to flip the dial, to change the channel, and many of the things they could switch to don’t have advertising at all,” said Scott Rosenberg, a senior vice president at Roku. “It’s incumbent on platforms and apps that are ad-supported to work harder at how they put ads in front of the consumer.”

Virtual product placement companies like Mirriad and its rival Ryff said they are talking with streaming services about using data to customize product placements to viewers. Mirriad and Ryff would not name their potential partners.

Product placement is appealing to streaming services because it allows them to work with companies without interrupting a show with commercials. Hulu, which comes in a low-cost ad-supported version and also has a commercial-free option for subscribers willing to pay more, said that so-called brand integrations on its platform have been far more effective than 30-second commercials at raising viewers’ interest in products.

Read the full article here.

Condé Nast signs video-first deal with ad tech company Mirriad

Condé Nast signs video-first deal with ad tech company Mirriad

  • London startup Mirriad uses AI to insert ads and products into pre-existing videos, and it just signed an exclusive ad deal with Condé Nast.
  • This move is part of the publisher’s effort to monetize its properties and become a “video-first” business.
  • Mirriad CEO Stephan Beringer said advertisers can use its technology to, say, have their products or ads appear in all scenes set in living rooms or breakfast environments across Condé Nast properties.
  • Mirriad has already used its technology to insert new ads into reruns of ABC sitcom “Modern Family.”

Fans of YouTube series like Allure’s “Work It” and Bon Appétit’s “From the Test Kitchen” should get ready to see more ads popping up in their favorite videos — but not in the way they might think.

Publishing giant Condé Nast, which has positioned itself as a “video-first” business, just announced a deal with London-based startup Mirriad, which uses artificial intelligence to place ads and products into pre-existing videos.

For example, it recently inserted virtual Prudential billboards, print ads for FreshPet, and an entire Sherwin-Williams store into reruns of ABC sitcom “Modern Family.”

Mirriad works with several broadcasters in North America including Univision, Fox, and NBC, but Tencent is its largest single client.

The sizzle reel below, released in October to promote a deal that Mirriad signed with the Chinese web conglomerate, shows potential uses for the platform.

Brands will be able to “takeover” Condé Nast videos

With Condé Nast, Mirriad will look for opportunities to integrate ads and products across its portfolio based on internal data about viewers, CEO Stephan Beringer told Business Insider.

For example, advertisers can design “takeovers” that will see their products appear prominently in all scenes set in living rooms or breakfast environments across the publisher’s videos.

Beringer wouldn’t give financial details of the deal or name any of the brands involved but said negotiations are ongoing.

Beringer said his company is developing advancements that would let advertisers target different promotions to different people watching the same videos.

The deal is part of Vogue and The New Yorker parent Condé Nast’s plans to grow its video audience and ad revenue. At this year’s NewFront presentation in April, CMO and CRO Pamela Drucker Mann said the company was “uniquely positioned to connect our advertisers” with an estimated 1 billion monthly viewers.

The publisher is betting its business on Condé Nast Entertainment

The deal comes as Condé Nast is seeking to stabilize its business in a tough climate for publishers.

Condé Nast has sold off some of its properties in addition to restructuring its teams, going through several rounds of layoffs, and doing more with events, ecommerce, sponsored content and, of course, video. According to New York Magazine, print advertising dropped from 80% to 40% of the company’s revenue over the past five years.

Oren Katzeff joined Condé Nast late last year from Tastemade as president of the entertainment division, leading its shift toward video — and Mirriad is in the process of doing a similar deal with Tastemade.

See article here.

In-Video Brand Insertion Will Soon Be Viewer-Targeted: Mirriad’s Beringer

In-Video Brand Insertion Will Soon Be Viewer-Targeted: Mirriad’s Beringer

BeetTV

Imagine a world where the TV shows and movies you watch are supported not only by digitally-inserted brand placements, but also in which those insertions are custom-targeted at individual viewers.

On your screen, a character lifts a can of Mountain Dew but, on your friend’s, it is a can of Pepsi.

That is the world now coming in to view, thanks to computer vision technology that is already connected to ad sales systems and which, next, will be upgraded to dynamically serve different viewers with unique play-outs.

In this interview with Beet.TV, Stephan Beringer, CEO of Mirriad, explains how his company enables post-production brand insertion for makers and distributors of TV shows and movies. That could include:

  • real-world objects that weren’t in the original shoot, like a vehicle or a packet of potato chips.
  • overlaying existing ad creatives, like display ads on to computer screens or out-of-home ads on to street billboards.

Mirriad has already been enabling this new revenue stream – which aims to be an antidote to commercial break fatigue – for content owners since it launched more than a decade ago, allowing them to sell placements where none were planned at production, insertable up to two hours before airing. But the latest step is making those insertions viewer-targeted.

Varied versions

“All the platforms are, literally, as we speak, getting ready for that, if they’re not already, it’s just a matter of a couple of months from now,” Beringer says.

“What we can expose in the content will now be made available in an addressable manner. You will have data triggers and business rules that determine what is being played out to which audience.

“You could be seeing the same movie that I’m watching on a platform, but you might be seeing a slightly different version, because the same product comes in a variation for you and a different one for me.

“So we are definitely ready. We’re starting to do that. I cannot talk too much about with whom, but basically, our technology allows for the rendering of different versions.”

A solution for ‘skipping’?

Mirriad launched near London in 2007, took several rounds of investment and listed on the UK’s AIM market in 2017. Beringer became CEO in September 2018, replacing Mark Popkiewicz after 11 years, following several years at Publicis, which Beringer ended as global president of data, technology and innovation.

After spending a couple of decades in the ad agency world, Beringer has now become a realist about the state of ad effectiveness.

“I dare to say, people have been educated to look away from advertising,” he laments. “One of the most used buttons on the internet is probably the ‘Skip Ad’ button. No offence.”

Read the full article here.

AI is digitally pasting products into your favorite films and TV

AI is digitally pasting products into your favorite films and TV

New Scientist

18 November 2019

Ad blockers aren’t going to be useful for much longer. Major entertainment companies including Univision and 20th Century Fox are now using artificial intelligence to digitally insert advertisements and products into movies and TV shows after they have been filmed.

The firms are using technology developed by UK company Mirriad to insert flat posters on buildings, walls and buses in already-filmed scenes and even to add 3D objects. It has the potential to make advertising more targeted and ubiquitous than ever before, and also virtually impossible to avoid. The technology blurs the line between advertising and entertainment, and could take the feel of a production outside a director’s creative vision for it.

The technique has been used to insert ads into shows such as Modern Family, which is produced by 20th Century Fox. In the US, Mirriad has also worked with Univision and Sony Pictures Television so far. In Europe, Mirriad has partnerships with French broadcasters France Television and TF1, and with RTL in Germany. In China, Mirriad-inserted ads have been seen by more than 100 million viewers on video-streaming website Tencent Video.

Mirriad analyses films or TV episodes for space where ads or objects could be inserted, using an AI to identify information about each scene – whether it’s on a street, for example, or of a family. The AI creates an inventory of all the potential times and spaces for where ads could be inserted into a film or TV show.

“We can recognise all the scenes when people are in an elevator,” says Ann Wang at Tencent Video. It allows them to digitally insert advertising posters onto elevator walls. Other scenes include those shot in living rooms and office meeting rooms, which contain table space where bottles or cups of particular drinks brands can be inserted.

The goal is to train the algorithm to understand emotion, context and continuity across scenes, so that the process of ad insertion can be fully automated, says Mirriad CEO Stephan Beringer.

Mirriad and Tencent Video both have plans under way to tailor these in-video ads to individual viewers. Tencent has the technology to show different advertisements to different people, but hasn’t yet launched the feature commercially, says Wang. “Our goal is definitely to go in that direction,” she says.

Take a scenario in which two people are separately watching a television series. “You would be watching the exact same scene, but we would be seeing different things,” says Beringer – say, a silver or red car, or different variations of a brand of soft drink. Mirriad can produce several versions of each ad, and what the viewer sees would depend on how the entertainment company targets them.

“Consumers are not always aware that the commercial content is being blended in with the cultural content,” says Caroline Moraes at the University of Birmingham, UK. “There’s a blurring of lines.”

“If people are not aware, then you could argue that there is an element of deception there, or that people have not been fully informed of how they’re being communicated to,” she says.

Companies have long paid for product placement in entertainment. For example, Reese’s Pieces appear in the Steven Spielberg film E.T. and there are multiple brands featured in the film clip for Lady Gaga’s 2010 song “Telephone”. But in these examples, it is incorporated during filming.

But there are some specific concerns with ad-insertion technology. For example, actors may be seen to be endorsing items that appear in the scenes with their fictional characters, which they may have little say in because it happens after the fact.

To avoid conflict with pre-existing endorsement deals, Tencent uses technology that recognises well-known actors in its content, to identify scenes where ads shouldn’t be inserted.

Films may have a theatrical release, followed by distribution on streaming services and network television, as well as internationally. Each round could have different adverts, and whether the money goes towards the distributors or content creators is another consideration, says Beringer.

Creative integrity and continuity within a show or film are also factors. New ads inserted into older content retrospectively may not be in line with what a film or TV director wanted to do, for example.

There are strict rules around product placement, but these may need updating for this more sophisticated and potentially more targeted kind of digitally inserted advertising.

20th Century Fox and NBC Universal didn’t respond to New Scientist’s requests for comment.

See the article here.

TF1 Pub and SEAT win ‘Data and Creativity Grand Prix’ for Automotive category

TF1 Pub and SEAT win ‘Data and Creativity Grand Prix’ for Automotive category

TF1 PUB and SEAT win the ‘Data and Creativity Grand Prix’ in the automotive category thanks to Mirriad’s innovative new advertising format.

SEAT is the first advertiser to inaugurate the virtual product placement offer in a leading French saga, Tomorrow Belongs to Us, on TF1, a campaign managed by the teams of TF1 LIVE and the Fuse agency Re-Mind PHD.

Based on a new technology developed by Mirriad, this unique advertising format in France, allows advertisers to insert the visual elements of a brand through product and signage ad insertions in content.

The campaign ran between January and April 2019 in the series Tomorrow Belongs to Us with a total of 8 brand insertions, naturally embedded in the content after it was produced, in the form of street posters, magazines, and the automaker’s website displayed on a computer screen.

The TF1 PUB teams are honored for the recognition for an offering that allows brands to innovate their advertising.

Luckin Coffee uses Mirriad technology in large-scale campaign to build brand awareness

Luckin Coffee uses Mirriad technology in large-scale campaign to build brand awareness

Luckin Coffee, the Chinese coffee chain that’s pioneering a tech-driven model to fill online orders, is using Mirriad technology in a large-scale campaign to build brand awareness.

To date, Luckin assets have been embedded in over 100 scenes in 11 shows that have appeared on Tencent’s video platform, including  the popular drama “Over the Sea I Come to You.” These assets, which include outdoor posters, storefronts and products featuring the Luckin Coffee logo, were inserted into the most contextually relevant scenes identified by Mirriad’s advanced computer vision technology powered by AI.

Eye-tracking research conducted by Kantar demonstrated high visibility and audience awareness of the ad insertions.

The 3,000-store chain plans to run more brand insertions as part of the campaign with Mirriad.

Sadness and disgust among emotions that drive brand value, says biometric study

Sadness and disgust among emotions that drive brand value, says biometric study

Sadness sells, according to a new biometric study that measures the link between emotions in entertainment content and brand value.

The research, by AI-powered technology company Mirriad and applied neuroscience firm SPARK Neuro, drove significant value increases across all brands and products that were tested included potato chips, Lysol disinfectant wipes and Jeep Wrangler.

Mirriad CEO, Stephan Beringer, said: “This first-of-its-kind study is beneficial in understanding which emotions can drive brand value from viewers. Through our findings we understand exactly where to place brands in emotional context and how to take the impact of advertising in content even further. We’ve also created a comprehensive approach for content distributors and creators on how to best place brands to resonate with audiences.”

The study, split between two phases, explored the impact of emotions on consumers’ interest in different kinds of products and how much they were willing to pay for them. In the first phase of the study, 900 participants were tested online assessing the impact of eight emotions in content across different brand categories. Among others, the research revealed that sadness drove the highest valuation for the food & drink category (+17 percent); anticipation for the automotive category (+seven percent); and disgust for CPG/cleaning products (+22 percent). 

Read the full article by Campaign here.

Sadness, romance, or disgust? Research puts brands in emotional context

Sadness, romance, or disgust? Research puts brands in emotional context

Consumers are getting used to seeing brands injected into entertainment, from movies to video games to playlists. So it was just a matter of time before someone tried to link the mood of a given scene to its impact on brand perception.

The verdict? Sadness sells, and disgust is surprisingly motivating, says Stephan Beringer, CEO of Mirriad, a computer vision and AI-powered technology company.

A study Mirriad did in partnership with Spark Neuro, an applied neuroscience firm, measured the impact of emotions generated by entertainment content on brand value. It looked at products that included potato chips, Lysol disinfectant wipes and Jeep Wrangler.

Beringer tells Marketing Daily this research is important because it builds on the basics. “We already know a lot from contextual analysis. We wouldn’t put a bottle of beer or jar of baby food on a conference room table, for instance. And we can also predict where people’s eyes will go in any given scene.”

Read the full article by MediaPost here.

The path to emotional optimization in content

The path to emotional optimization in content

By Stephan Beringer, Mirriad CEO

Stephan Beringer Headshot 2019Ad targeting is a key strategy in the marketing arsenal, but it only goes so far. Messaging needs to constantly secure high relevance to truly cut through the noise or targeting cannot deliver the value it should. That’s where emotional intelligence comes in, integrating brands in content that evokes particular emotional responses to drive higher relevance and brand value.

Publishers are already working in this space. For example, The New York Times (Project Feels) and USA Today (Lens Targeting) have started indexing and selling ad adjacencies to content based on readers’ emotional responses.

At Mirriad, we embed brands directly into video content that’s contextually relevant. Our work across the globe has demonstrated outstanding effectiveness in engaging viewers. Now we are going beyond context by taking the first step toward data-driven emotional intelligence, a new paradigm that underpins marketers’ growing opportunity to connect with viewers in content.

To start this process, we commissioned an independent research study from neuroanalytics company SPARK Neuro to investigate how different emotions in content drive brand value across multiple categories. In Phase 1 of the study, 900 participants were surveyed online to perform a behavioral economics valuation task across eight different emotions. Next, the emotions with the greatest increase in brand value for three brand categories were further tested in a neuroanalytics lab. The study revealed astonishing results, opening up a range of new strategic considerations for brands willing to look beyond traditionally supportive environments. For example, the study found:

  • When a billboard for Jeep Wrangler was placed in a suspenseful hostage scene during an action drama, viewer “anticipation” prompted a 6% increase ($1,898) in perceived product value. In comparison, “joy,” prompted a 3.3% decrease in perceived product value in Phase 1 of the study.
  • When Lysol disinfectant wipes were inserted in a gruesome scene, viewer “disgust” prompted a 22% increase ($1.30) in perceived product value. In comparison, “amusement,” spurred an 11.1% decrease in product value in Phase 1.
  • When a potato chip brand was inserted into a very sad scene involving a mother and child, viewer “sadness” prompted a 27% percent increase ($1.28) in perceived product value. In comparison, “nostalgia,” scored an 11.1% decrease in perceived value of a similar food product in Phase 1.

For brands and their partners, these findings suggest the potential for significant opportunities to drive incremental value—even when the emotional placement seems to go against conventional thinking. “In the long run, marketers could collect data to develop powerful proprietary intelligence about the best emotional placements for their brands to outperform their competitors. 

Using new in-content ad formats, brands can be placed into a broader canvas of multiple emotions, providing peak moments to connect with viewers. This is critical as viewers increasingly avoid or ignore traditional commercial breaks, while still staying emotionally invested in the content itself.

Here’s how different sectors in marketing and advertising can start to explore the benefits of emotional targeting: 

  • Technology: Identifying emotional opportunities

For emotional targeting to succeed, technology companies will need to develop solutions that go beyond context and identify emotionally rich inventory available for brand insertions. Accurately indexing the emotions provoked by unique content moments will be a key prerequisite for doing so.

  • Creators: More moments for higher yield

Content owners that can offer a broad array of emotional amplitudes will be perfectly positioned for this new era. A TV series, for instance, relies on the peaks and troughs of dramatic narrative, with story moments that span the gamut of emotions. This creates a rich palette of responses to offer for exploitation and an opportunity to multiply the monetization potential beyond common denominators, averages and genres. 

  • Brands: Emotional context vs. comfort zones

Emotional targeting will pose new challenges for advertisers. For example, the study found feelings of disgust and sadness to be effective emotions to tap into, but are brands willing to integrate their ads into those scenes? Yet, as our research shows, positive emotions don’t necessarily sell—emotional intensity does. The key is not to focus on just one emotion but to find the right mix of emotions for optimal engagements for your brand.

  • Agencies: More ways to create

Emotional targeting will also open a way for agencies to dive into some uncharted waters. Agencies can take advantage of emotionally rich environments to try new creative tactics that go hand in hand with content-driven emotional targeting—for example, in-content sequencing, product and brand message synchronization or, generally, the versioning of messaging to fit storylines. 

Today, the industry—programming services, brands, agencies and technology companies such as Mirriad—is just starting to realize the full potential of emotional targeting. Eventually, as we push the boundaries on what’s considered “acceptable” to explore different emotional impacts across audiences, demographics and behaviors, we will discover even more opportunities and ways of connecting with people. Only then will we reach the age of dynamic emotional optimization in content.

Driving brand value with emotionally intelligent advertising in content

Driving brand value with emotionally intelligent advertising in content

Working to make deeper connections with viewers, Mirriad is taking ad targeting to a new level through emotional intelligence—integrating brands in content that evokes rich emotional responses to drive higher relevance and brand value.

Mirriad’s work in embedding brands directly into video content that’s contextually relevant is already paying off for marketers. Our work across the globe for companies such as T-Mobile in the U.S. with Univision, Ctrip in China with Tencent and SEAT in France with TF1 has demonstrated outstanding effectiveness in engaging viewers.

Now we are taking the next steps to explore the carryover effect of emotionally rich content on embedded brands. To start this process, we commissioned an independent research study from neuroanalytics company SPARK Neuro to investigate how different emotions in content drive brand value across multiple categories.

In the first part of the study, 900 participants were surveyed online to perform a behavioral economics valuation task across eight different emotions, including emotions that might seem counterintuitive, such as disgust and sadness. Next, the emotions with the greatest increase in brand value for three brand categories—Automotive, CPG/Cleaning and Food & Drink—were tested in a neuroanalytics lab.

The study revealed impressive results, opening up a range of new strategic considerations for brands willing to look beyond traditionally supportive environments. For example, the study found:

  • When a billboard for Jeep Wrangler was placed in a suspenseful hostage scene during an action drama, viewer “anticipation” prompted a 6% increase ($1,898) in perceived product value.
  • When Lysol disinfectant wipes were inserted in a gruesome scene, viewer “disgust” prompted a 22% increase ($1.30) in perceived product value.
  • When a potato chip brand was inserted into a very sad scene involving a mother and child, viewer “sadness” prompted a 27% percent increase ($1.28) in perceived product value.

For brands and their partners, these findings offer new possibilities to drive substantial incremental value through emotionally rich content as the industry moves toward data-driven emotional intelligence, a new paradigm that underpins marketers’ growing opportunity to connect with viewers in content.

Ctrip: Driving brand awareness and consideration

Ctrip: Driving brand awareness and consideration

Goal

Ctrip, one of China’s biggest online travel agencies, wanted to amplify their online TV campaign on Tencent by running Mirriad in-video ads in the popular drama, ‘Over the Sea I Come to You’. Ctrip’s goal was to drive brand awareness and increase brand consideration for Ctrip as well as convert the audience to Ctrip users.

Solution

Ctrip assets were embedded in Tencent’s popular drama, ‘Over the Sea I Come to You’, in the most contextually relevant scenes. Outdoor posters, lightboxes and bus ads were inserted into scenes identified by Mirriad’s advanced technology to ensure the best exposure for viewer attention.

Research methodology

The research objective was to measure the performance of Mirriad embeds over the results gained from the ad unexposed audience. Kantar conducted an advertising effectiveness study to understand both how well the ad format drove brand KPI’s as well as opinions of the Mirriad ad format.

Results

Top of mind awareness +17 PPT

Recommendation of brand +10 PPT

Brand consideration +10 PPT

 

Tencent members audience. Percent point increase unexposed vs exposed to Mirriad placements. Sample: 200control /200 exposed. Kantar survey amongst 18-45  & watched online videos in last month . Aug 2019.

Mirriad partners with Tencent, one of the world’s largest video platforms, to reach huge entertainment audiences with branded content solution

Mirriad partners with Tencent, one of the world’s largest video platforms, to reach huge entertainment audiences with branded content solution

Mirriad’s technology integrates with Tencent to dynamically serve branded content to large audiences


NEW YORK, NY, October 10, 2019:
Computer vision and AI-powered platform company Mirriad announces a two-year exclusive agreement with Tencent, one of the largest online video platforms in China. The breakthrough partnership will allow advertisers to reach targeted audiences by integrating branded content directly into entertainment programming  without interrupting the viewer experience. The key innovation allows only the new programme segments containing advertising to be delivered to Tencent and integrated at the point Tencent releases content to its digital video platforms.

Mirriad and Tencent have been working to develop new technology which integrates Mirriad’s in-video technology more closely with Tencent’s video platforms.  With Mirriad’s API, the integration will be fully automated with ease and speed to ultimately transform the way advertisers engage with their target audiences in content.

Says Stephan Beringer, CEO of Mirriad, “We are excited to partner with Tencent to bring this new ad format to advertisers in China. Our ambition is to partner with the biggest broadcasters and digital platforms around the world to create new in-video inventory that helps advertisers connect with engaged audiences.”

Mirriad is also growing its partnerships in the US and Europe. Campaigns such as T-Mobile in the U.S. and SEAT in France have shown consistently impressive uplift in brand awareness and consideration.

About Mirriad

Mirriad’s award-winning solution unleashes new revenue for content producers and distributors by creating new advertising inventory in content. Our patented, AI and computer vision technology dynamically inserts products and innovative signage formats after content is produced. Mirriad’s market-first solution seamlessly integrates with existing subscription and advertising models, and dramatically improves the viewer experience by limiting commercial interruptions.

Mirriad currently operates in the US, Europe and China.

Biometric study reveals link between emotions in entertainment content and brand value

Biometric study reveals link between emotions in entertainment content and brand value

The carryover effect of emotions – sadness, anticipation, disgust –
is shown to drive brand value


NEW YORK, NY, September 23, 2019: 
Sadness sells, according to a recent neural and biometric study from computer vision and AI-powered technology company Mirriad and applied neuroscience company SPARK Neuro. The research, which examined the effect of emotions in entertainment content on brand value, drove significant value increases across all brands and products that were tested. These products included potato chips, Lysol disinfectant wipes and Jeep Wrangler.

Says Mirriad CEO Stephan Beringer, “This first-of-its-kind study is beneficial in understanding which emotions can drive brand value from viewers. Through our findings we understand exactly where to place brands in emotional context and how to take the impact of advertising in content even further. We’ve also created a comprehensive approach for content distributors and creators on how to best place brands to resonate with audiences.”

The study, split between two phases, explored the impact of emotions on consumers’ interest in different kinds of products and how much they were willing to pay for them. In the first phase of the study, 900 participants were tested online assessing the impact of eight emotions in content across different brand categories. Among others, the research revealed that sadness drove the highest valuation for the food & drink category (+17%); anticipation for the automotive category (+7%); and disgust for CPG/cleaning products (+22%).

In the second phase of the study, using the emotions with the highest lift from the first phase, Mirriad’s technology was used to insert products and signage ads into content sparking the identified emotions, and 50 participants then underwent biometric testing in SPARK Neuro’s neuroanalytics lab.

The research found that the combination of targeted emotional scenes paired with product and signage ad insertions in the content elicited significant price valuation lifts for each of the brand categories tested due to the ‘emotional carryover’ effect. Jeep Wrangler’s signage ad was inserted into a highly suspenseful scene and showed a 6% lift in product valuation after viewing; Lysol disinfectant wipes were inserted into a disgusting scene that resulted in a 22% price valuation lift; and a bag of potato chips was inserted into a very sad scene involving a mother and child, resulting in a 27% price valuation lift.

Says SPARK Neuro CEO & Founder, Spencer Gerrol, “Connecting emotional scenes with brands in content elicits strong changes in value perception. It’s not as simple as owning a single emotion, but rather being present in a range of emotions to leverage the ‘emotional carryover’ effect.”

This new research will be presented in a panel at Advertising Week New York, Driving brand value with emotional intelligence in content, on Monday, September 23, at 1 p.m. ET. Featured panelists include Stephan Beringer, CEO of Mirriad; Spencer Gerrol, CEO and Founder of SPARK Neuro; Deidre Smalls-Landau, U.S. CMO & EVP, Global Culture of UM Worldwide; and Nobles Crawford, Content Strategy Manager, Media & Digital for Reckitt Benckiser.

About Mirriad

Mirriad is a computer vision and AI-powered platform company, built on Academy Award-winning entertainment tech, with 14 patents.

Using sophisticated technologies, Mirriad connects people with brands through seamless ad insertions in popular linear and digital content. Advertisers can now reach very large target audiences in a contextually relevant way without interrupting the viewing experience.

Research has consistently shown in-video advertising to be highly effective for the marketer and preferred by audiences. Mirriad is headquartered in London, with offices in New York, Paris, Munich, Mumbai and Shanghai.

About SPARK Neuro

Founded in 2017, SPARK Neuro is a neuroanalytics tech company revolutionizing the evaluation of audience engagement in advertising and entertainment. Instead of relying on traditional, biased approaches, SPARK Neuro goes right to the source, measuring brain and other nervous system activity to see exactly when people are engaged and when they are not. SPARK Neuro quantifies attention and emotional levels with second-by-second precision.

SPARK Neuro’s research is trusted by major brands, ad agencies, TV networks, movie studios and the U.S. military. Partners include Anheuser-Busch, Barclays, Clorox, FedEx, Fidelity, General Motors, JetBlue, Hulu, Mars, NBC, Paramount, State Farm, Universal, Walmart and numerous other Fortune 500 companies.

FranceTV Publicité launches new in-video advertising solution in partnership with Mirriad

FranceTV Publicité launches new in-video advertising solution in partnership with Mirriad

Continuing to drive innovation, FranceTV Publicité offers brands the next generation of product placement with Mirriad’s in-video advertising solution


NEW YORK, NY, September 18, 2019:
Computer vision and AI-powered platform company Mirriad, is partnering with FranceTV Publicité who announced this week it has launched three tailored offers of next generation product placement using the Mirriad in-video advertising solution.

Mirriad’s sophisticated technology seamlessly inserts brands in France Télévisions popular scripted dramas after the content is produced. Brands are inserted in the content in the form of products, signage ads and video, in context to the storylines; without interrupting the viewers.

FranceTV Publicité is launching three tailored offers of in-video advertising, all sold with guaranteed seconds of brand exposure:

  • Daily content offer – on shows such as ‘Un si grand soleil’ and ‘Plus belle la vie’
  • Prime-time offer – allowing brands to be inserted in some of the most popular series in France: Candice Renoir, Il a déjà tes yeux, Astrid et Raphaëlle, Alexandra Ehle
  • Premium content offer – on series of France 2 like Dix pour cent (season 4)

The France Télévisions group’s offer is one of the most beautiful showcases of fiction in France. Every day, it attracts an audience of 12.6 million viewers. In one year, it has gathered nearly 800 times more than 3 million viewers*.

Marianne Siproudhis, CEO of FranceTV Publicité, states: “We are very excited to enable our partners to benefit from Mirriad’s innovative technology. The quality of the user experience is key to our strategy and we are convinced that augmented reality will revolutionize the market of product placement. This new ad format confirms this conviction; an advertisement is more effective when it is delivered at the right time, in the right place and in context.”

Stephan Beringer, Mirriad CEO, states: “Advertisers can now leverage Mirriad’s in-video advertising solution across a significant range of top-tier France Télévisions content offerings. We are excited to help drive new levels of advertising impact at unprecedented scale in the French market and thrilled to be partnering with FranceTV Publicité in this game-changing opportunity.”

*791 series/ Aired across France 2 and France 3, from September 2018 to August 2019.

About Mirriad

Mirriad is a computer vision and AI-powered platform company, built on Academy Award-winning entertainment technology, with 14 patents.

Using sophisticated technologies, Mirriad connects people with brands, through seamless ad insertions in popular linear and digital content. Advertisers can now reach very large target audiences in a contextually relevant way without interrupting the viewing experience.

Research has consistently shown in-video advertising to be highly effective for the marketer and preferred by audiences.

Mirriad is headquartered in London, with offices in New York, Paris, Munich, Mumbai, and Shanghai.

About FranceTV Publicité

FranceTV Publicité is the sales house of the France Télévisions Group, which has a market share of 28.5% TV viewers in France (average of 30 million daily viewers), a digital audience of 30 million unique monthly visitors and 806 million videos viewed each month across its digital sites.In 2018, it published a turnover of 396 million Euros. The sales house has 300 collaborators and commercialises ad inventory across 40 TV channels, including France 2, France 3, France 4, France 5, France O, less eres, TV5Monde, France 24, the main channels of Fox Networks Group, Turner, NBCUniversal, Trace Urban, Melody, as well as 30 website and mobile applications.

First ad perception study of in-video advertising in France

First ad perception study of in-video advertising in France

Mirriad ad format drives strong results with TF1 for auto company SEAT

NEW YORK, NY, July 23, 2019: Computer vision and AI-powered platform company Mirriad today revealed success metrics from its in-video advertising campaign for SEAT, the leading Spanish carmaker owned by the Volkswagen Group. Leveraging Mirriad’s technology to amplify its traditional product placement within the prime-time series Demain Nous Appartient (Tomorrow Belongs to Us) on France’s TF1, SEAT saw remarkable increases in key metrics including brand confidence and positive opinion.

SEAT is the first advertiser in France to leverage the in-video ad format. The campaign, developed in conjunction with TF1 and media companies Fuse and Re-Mind PHD, involved a variety of creative executions brought to life in the most contextually relevant scenes, from street signage to web pages on computer screens.

An ad effectiveness study conducted by TF1 with Toluna, a leading global consumer research company, found Mirriad’s ad format drove significant increases to brand KPIs, including:

● Driving strong increase in positive opinions of the SEAT brand: +24 points
● Brand confidence: +22 points
● Talking/discussing the SEAT brand: +15 points

These results are based on a benchmarking of viewers who watched episodes with Mirriad insertions versus viewers who watched episodes without the insertions.

Says Stephan Beringer, CEO of Mirriad, “It’s great to see research confirming again the huge impact we deliver, as our ad insertions are highly contextually relevant to audiences and always viewable in the content. We’re honored to partner with TF1 to bring our ad format to France, with a prominent automotive brand.”

About Mirriad

Mirriad is a computer vision and AI-powered platform company, built on Academy Award-winning entertainment tech, with 14 patents.

Using sophisticated technologies, Mirriad connects people with brands, through seamless ad insertions in popular linear and digital content. Advertisers can now reach very large target audiences in a contextually relevant way without interrupting the viewing experience.

Research has consistently shown in-video advertising to be highly effective for the marketer and preferred by audiences.

Mirriad is headquartered in London, with offices in New York, Paris, Munich, Mumbai, and Shanghai.

About TF1 Advertising

TF1 Publicité, the leading multi-media agency in France, markets the TF1 group’s commercials (TF1, TMC, TFX, TF1 Series Films, LCI, TV Breizh, Ushuaia TV, History) and Discovery Communications Group in France. On the radio market, TF1 Publicité markets the spaces of Indies Radios, the first commercial offer on this media, as well as M Radio.

SEAT: Complementing product placement with in-video ads drives KPIs

SEAT: Complementing product placement with in-video ads drives KPIs

Goal

SEAT, the leading Spanish carmaker owned by the Volkswagen Group, wanted to amplify its traditional product placement activity within prime time TV and see the KPI uplift of Mirriad in-video ad insertions.

Solution

Mirriad embedded SEAT assets in the prime time TV drama Demain Nous Appartient (Tomorrow Belongs to Us) running on TF1, into the most contextually relevant scenes that capture viewer attention. Mirriad’s technology flexibly delivered the SEAT brand across nine episodes, using a combination of creative executions from street signage to web pages on computer screens.

Research methodology

TF1 and Toluna, a leading global consumer research company, conducted an advertising effectiveness study to understand how well the ad format drove brand KPI’s as well as opinions of the new advertising format. The research objective was to measure the performance of Mirriad insertions over the results gained from the ad unexposed audience.

Results

Driving strong increase in positive opinions of the SEAT brand: +24 points

Brand Confidence +22 points

Talking/discussing the SEAT brand: +15 points

 

Percent point increase do not recall group vs recall Mirriad insertions. Sample: 201 control /125 exposed. Toluna survey amongst 15+ views of Demain Nous Appartient (Tomorrow Belongs to Us). June 2019

Mirriad Wins 2019 Effective Digital Marketing Award For Innovative T-Mobile Campaign on Univision

Mirriad Wins 2019 Effective Digital Marketing Award For Innovative T-Mobile Campaign on Univision

Mirriad wins ‘Most Effective Video Campaign’ category for driving double-digit increases
in awareness, favorability and consideration for leading wireless provider

NEW YORK, NY, July 11, 2019: Computer vision and AI-powered platform company Mirriad, today announced it has received the award for “Most Effective Video Campaign” by Masterclassing for its campaign with T-Mobile on Univision. T-Mobile leveraged Mirriad’s technology to drive brand consideration, awareness and brand favorability. The winners were revealed at an Awards Ceremony in London.

Mirriad’s proprietary technology creates opportunities for advertisers to seamlessly insert their brand creative into premium content without interrupting the viewer experience.

In an effort to reach Hispanic adults aged 18 to 49, T-Mobile complemented its TV spot campaign in Univision’s popular prime-time Spanish crime drama, “La Piloto II.” T-Mobile signage on building facades, indoor and outdoor scenes, was naturally inserted into the most contextually relevant scenes to capture viewer attention.

Mirriad’s technology successfully delivered T-Mobile’s brand message at scale across 10 episodes with over 200 seconds of brand exposure, reinforcing T-Mobile’s spot ads that ran before each episode. Mirriad drove impressive increases over the TV spot activity, which itself far exceeded research company Kantar’s telecom category norms. The TV spot campaign itself gained high brand consideration for T-Mobile amongst consumers at 75%, the addition of Mirriad was able to increase consideration further to 87%, an increase of 12ppt. The campaign also gained remarkable results for viewer likability with 88% liking the format.

Said CEO Stephan Beringer, “We are excited that the collaboration between T-Mobile, Univision and Mirriad achieved fantastic results and garnered industry recognition.”

The Masterclassing Effective Digital Marketing Awards feature a diverse global judging panel comprised of leading brand marketers from the US, UK, Canada, Spain, Germany, Singapore, Australia, and South Africa, representing brands from around the world. In 2018, Masterclassing acquired Dot Media, the company which publishes Mobile Marketing Magazine.

About Mirriad

Mirriad is a computer vision and AI-powered platform company, built on Academy Award-winning entertainment tech, with 14 patents.

Using sophisticated technologies, Mirriad connects people with brands, through seamless ad insertions in popular linear and digital content. Advertisers can now reach very large target audiences in a contextually relevant way without interrupting the viewing experience.

Research has consistently shown in-video advertising to be highly effective for the marketer and preferred by audiences.

Mirriad is headquartered in London, with offices in New York, Paris, Munich, Mumbai, and Shanghai.